Multiple-Sclerosis-and-Hypothyroidism
Annesse Brockley/Kristin Urdiales,
Guests
Thyroid Nation

Recently we demonstrated that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) lack the essential amino acid “phenylalanine” and also the amino acid “tyrosine” and the neurotransmitter “dopamine”, both of which are derived from phenylalanine. The lack of dopamine would explain the brain gray matter loss found in patients with MS.



As the graph below shows, both of the thyroid hormones (thyroxine and triiodothyronine) are also derived from tyrosine, so we would expect to see an association between MS and hypothyroidism (a condition in which the thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormone).

In the following study published in Neurology researchers found that thyroid disorders, which were accounted for mainly by the prevalence of hypothyroidism, were at least “three times” more common in women with MS.

“…We found that thyroid disorders were at least three times more common in women with MS than in female controls. This was accounted for mainly by the prevalence of hypothyroidism among the female MS patients.”

We would also expect to find evidence of a lack of tyrosine in patients with hypothyroidism. Just as we would expect, researchers in the following study found low levels of tyrosine in patients with hypothyroidism.

The serum tyrosine level as an index of thyroid function.

“Serum tyrosine was measured in 22 normal subjects…10 patients with hypothyroidism… Low values were obtained in hypothyroidism…”

Symptoms of hypothyroidism:

• Sensitivity to cold
• Thin, brittle hair and fingernails
• Constipation
Weight gain
• Depression
• Joint or muscle pain
Fatigue
• Heavier menstrual periods
• Dry, pale skin

Take home message:

Patients with multiple sclerosis lack the enzymes that digest dietary proteins. Proteins contain essential amino acids such as phenylalanine. Research confirms that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) lack phenylalanine and the amino acid tyrosine, which is derived from phenylalanine. Tyrosine is needed to produce both of the thyroid hormones. The lack of tyrosine would explain the association between multiple sclerosis and hypothyroidism.

41-HhbXOuSLAlso, notice from the graph what else we should find lacking in patients with MS. Dopamine is needed to produce adrenaline and noradrenaline. We will discuss the lack of adrenaline and noradrenaline in patients with MS in our next post.

In our previous post we demonstrated that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) lack the essential amino acid ‘phenylalanine’, the amino acid ‘tyrosine’, and the neurotransmitter ‘dopamine’, both of which are derived from phenylalanine. The lack of dopamine would explain the brain gray matter loss found in patients with MS.

Sources:
-Karni A, et. al. Neurology. 1999 Sep 11;53(4):883-5.
-Malamos, B., C.J. Miras, J.N. Karli-Samouilidou, D.A. Koutras. 1966. J Endocrinol. July 1, 35 223-228 doi: 10.1677/joe.0.0350223.

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About the Authors

Kristin Urdiales and Annesse Brockley share that as a family, they suffered for years with the debilitating symptoms of autoimmune disease and fibromyalgia. Their days were characterized by extreme pain, fatigue, headaches and a catalog of other seemingly unexplainable symptoms that plague so many autoimmune sufferers daily.  They knew they had to understand the “why” behind their worst symptoms before they could begin to heal from them.  So they began researching, and they never stopped! Over the last 20 years they have brought the best of science and nature together to heal themselves and help others. This has led to them publishing two books Autoimmune The Cause and The Cure and Fibromyalgia The Cause and The Cure. Follow them on Facebook, Twitter and check out their website NatureHadItFirst.com.

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Questions or anything to add about the link between Hypothyroidism and Multiple Sclerosis? We want your thoughts in the comments section–Please!